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Wild View’s 10 Most Popular Posts from 2018

December 25, 2018

Wild View’s 10 Most Popular Posts from 2018

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Julie Larsen Maher Julie Larsen Maher

Throughout 2018, Wild View received many outstanding photos and stories from across the planet. We were surprised and fascinated as our contributors gave us a glimpse into the world of wildlife.

Here are the 10 most read posts from the past 12 months. The top three favorites feature a unique species of bat.

HAMMER-HEADED BAT,  HAMMER-HEADED BAT AMBASSADOR,  HAMMER-HEADED BAT FAMILY

Close-up, any given feature of the hammer-headed bat – eye, fur, nose, ear, wing, or foot – is extraordinary. The third post also shows one of the larger bat pups we’ve ever seen practically Velcroed to mom.–Sarah Olson. Photos by ©Sarah Olson/WCS and ©Vincent Munster.

KING COBRA IN NAME ONLY  

King cobras are the longest venomous snakes in the world, reaching lengths of nearly 18 feet and are native to Southeast Asia. –Avi Shuter. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS.

PINK PIGEON PROPAGATION

Pink pigeons are significantly larger than ring-necked doves and pigeon squabs grow quickly. –Alana O’Sullivan. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS.

 NOCTURNAL PRIMATES WITH A MIGHTY GRIP

Pygmy slow lorises live in trees and, when threatened, can secrete a toxin into their saliva making their bites toxic to predators including humans. –Danielle Hessel. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS.

WELCOME, TURTLE HATCHLING

The Bronx Zoo welcomed four Roti Island snake-necked turtle hatchlings. –Micah Siegel. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS.

FLYING COLORS FOR A BEE-EATER CHICK

This young bee-eater thrives in its established group. Only a short time ago, it depended on keepers for every single one of its needs. –Lisa Walker. Photos by Julie Larsen Maher and Lisa Walker ©WCS.

AZUL IN THE POOL

Tigers are one of the few large cats that actually enjoy the water. –Taryn Teegan. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS.

WATER LIZARDS

Their Latin name literally means “water lizard,” an apt name for these tropical Asian lizards as they rarely stray far from water. –Don Boyer. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS.


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